Friday, September 6, 2013

Another Significant Find Reported as Anti-Collector Archaeologist Seeks Ban on Metal Detecting

The Portable Antiquities Scheme has reported another significant find in Norfolk.  Meanwhile, a Greek academic archaeologist working in the United Kingdom, whose career has been devoted to seeking the repatriation of cultural artifacts to corrupt, bankrupt countries like Greece, has advocated that metal detecting be banned.   Thankfully, the researcher's views fall well outside the norm for British archaeologists.  Most have since made peace with metal detectorists.  After all, their finds, when properly recorded, have directed archaeologists to sites that would otherwise never be uncovered.

5 comments:

Paul Barford said...

In what way is this find "significant"? What do you think it tells us that we do not already know about Early medieval society from previous finds of a similar type?

Cultural Property Observer said...

I assume it adds to what we know about trade routes in Anglo-Saxon times, However, I'm not sure where you are going with this. Even if it is indeed a redundant find, so what. Isn't that also true for much archaeologists dig up?

Paul Barford said...

What am I getting at? I am asking why draw attention to this one find and label it "significant"?

The PAS did not call it "significant" did they, so why did you?

Cultural Property Observer said...

Well, it was significant enough to make the press and some coin collectors i know that specialize in the era think that it was significant--that's good enough for me. But to each his own.

stoutstandards said...

But when Mr. Barford is involved it's never "each his own". You should know that by now....